Did You Know?

Asthma is one of the lead causes of missed days of school accounting for an estimated 14.4 million lost days.3

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a disease that causes airways to inflame and narrow, making it difficult for air to flow to the lungs. Children with asthma experience symptoms such as:

  • Shortness of breath and/or trouble breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Chronic Cough
  • Tightness or pain in the chest

Asthma is more common in children than in adults. Almost 6.3 million people in the US with asthma are under the age of 18.1

Asthma can influence the life of children physically, emotionally, and socially.2 Children may be limited in the activities they are able to participate in due to dependence on medication. In addition, they may face consequences with peer relationships such as bullying and low self-esteem.

Asthma Care Reference Guide

.Triggers and Causes

Triggers and Causes

Asthma is generally divided into two types: allergic or non-allergic. In allergic asthma, asthma attacks can be triggered by exposure to environmental allergens such as pollen, dust mites, and mold. In non-allergic asthma, attacks can be triggered by factors such as the weather, stress, smoke, and even exercise.4

Minimizing exposure to asthma triggers is often the most important component of symptom control. Whether the asthma is allergic or non-allergic, it is essential to identify the triggers and avoid and minimize your child’s exposure to them.

Symptom Tracker

Asthma Management

Asthma Management

Regular assessment and monitoring of a patient with asthma is imperative to determine whether the goals of therapy are being achieved. Asthma should be monitored regularly by a physician and the child’s caregiver. Aspects of asthma that should be addressed often include:

  • Frequency, severity, and triggers of episodes of worsening asthma
  • Frequency of daytime and nighttime symptoms
  • Maintenance medication use and compliance
  • Rescue medication use
  • Inhaler technique
  • Impact of asthma on the quality of life of the patient and his/her family

The National Institute of Health recommends that children aged 10 or older – and younger children who are able – take an active role in their asthma care.5 By minimizing exposure to triggers and developing a proper management plan, children with asthma can lead a healthy, active lifestyle.

Asthma Management Plan

Resources

Resources

To learn more about asthma, symptoms, medications, and other asthma-related topics, visit the following websites and talk to your child’s pediatrician.

Allergy & Asthma Network

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology

American Lung Association

1. Asthma Facts and Figures. (August 2015) Retrieved from http://www.aafa.org/page/asthma-facts.aspx
2.Social and Emotional Impact of Childhood Asthma. (March 2017) Retrieved from http://adc.bmj.com/content/archdischild/66/4/458.full.pdf
3. Asthma & Children Fact Sheet. (February 2017) Retrieved from http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/asthma/learn-about-asthma/asthma-children-facts-sheet.html
4. Asthma Basics. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.aafa-md.org/asthma_basics.htm
5. Asthma. (June 2014) http://www.aafa.org/page/asthma-facts.aspx

0417 FLX PRM WBST PAT ABT_JH1

Did You Know?

Asthma is one of the lead causes of missed days of school accounting for an estimated 14.4 million lost days.3

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a disease that causes airways to inflame and narrow, making it difficult for air to flow to the lungs. Children with asthma experience symptoms such as:

  • Shortness of breath and/or trouble breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Chronic Cough
  • Tightness or pain in the chest

Asthma is more common in children than in adults. Almost 6.3 million people in the US with asthma are under the age of 18.1

Asthma can influence the life of children physically, emotionally, and socially.2 Children may be limited in the activities they are able to participate in due to dependence on medication. In addition, they may face consequences with peer relationships such as bullying and low self-esteem.

Asthma Care Reference Guide

.Triggers and Causes

Triggers and Causes

Asthma is generally divided into two types: allergic or non-allergic. In allergic asthma, asthma attacks can be triggered by exposure to environmental allergens such as pollen, dust mites, and mold. In non-allergic asthma, attacks can be triggered by factors such as the weather, stress, smoke, and even exercise.4

Minimizing exposure to asthma triggers is often the most important component of symptom control. Whether the asthma is allergic or non-allergic, it is essential to identify the triggers and avoid and minimize your child’s exposure to them.

Symptom Tracker

Asthma Management

Asthma Management

Regular assessment and monitoring of a patient with asthma is imperative to determine whether the goals of therapy are being achieved. Asthma should be monitored regularly by a physician and the child’s caregiver. Aspects of asthma that should be addressed often include:

  • Frequency, severity, and triggers of episodes of worsening asthma
  • Frequency of daytime and nighttime symptoms
  • Maintenance medication use and compliance
  • Rescue medication use
  • Inhaler technique
  • Impact of asthma on the quality of life of the patient and his/her family

The National Institute of Health recommends that children aged 10 or older – and younger children who are able – take an active role in their asthma care.5 By minimizing exposure to triggers and developing a proper management plan, children with asthma can lead a healthy, active lifestyle.

Asthma Management Plan

Resources

Resources

To learn more about asthma, symptoms, medications, and other asthma-related topics, visit the following websites and talk to your child’s pediatrician.

Allergy & Asthma Network

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology

American Lung Association

1. Asthma Facts and Figures. (August 2015) Retrieved from http://www.aafa.org/page/asthma-facts.aspx
2.Social and Emotional Impact of Childhood Asthma. (March 2017) Retrieved from http://adc.bmj.com/content/archdischild/66/4/458.full.pdf
3. Asthma & Children Fact Sheet. (February 2017) Retrieved from http://www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/asthma/learn-about-asthma/asthma-children-facts-sheet.html
4. Asthma Basics. (n.d.) Retrieved from http://www.aafa-md.org/asthma_basics.htm
5. Asthma. (June 2014) http://www.aafa.org/page/asthma-facts.aspx

0417 FLX PRM WBST PAT ABT_JH1

Consult with a pediatrician to see if Flexichamber is right for your child

Consult with a pediatrician to see if Flexichamber is right for your child